Diary of a Young Naturalist – The Dandelion

I have decided, after a little hiatus, that I’m going to write a little short blog post every day – about something in Nature that has caught my eye. I write a diary every day, so in a sense, it will be a little more like that. I hope you like it and I hope it encourages me, to write a little more frequently again.

10.05.18

I took my camera out to the garden today, and a lone dandelion had its blooms inside out, like a windswept umbrella. It caught my eye, because I love dandelions. They honestly make me feel like sunshine itself and there is always some creature resting on an open bloom, if you have a little patience to wait. Vital life source for all emerging pollinators and a blast of uplifting yellow to brighten even the greatest of days. It stood tall and proud, unlike all the others, they were open and swaying in the breeze. All of a sudden raindrops plonked from the few clouds above and fell on all the others.

(I’ve been testing some functions on my camera, I liked singling out its uniqueness)

It was a nice little moment. Even though St Brigid’s day is long past, I thought I would include a beautiful poem and plate, it captures some elements of Spring.

I hope everyone is enjoying the sunshine and the screeching swifts.

Dara

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14 Responses

  1. I too love dandelions. When I got a new camera I will not say how many photos of them I took, lets say tens of lots! They are amazing and when you can catch them in fluffy mode, as the seeds are dancing free it is magical. Also the St Brigid poem is lovely. Thank you for sharing you passion for dandelions and the poem. I look forward to more posts.

  2. I like dandelions, they are like little suns, and seeing them makes me happy, so thanks for writing about the dandelion. I see lots of them on my way to work, but most of them have already turned into the puffball state. One word for them in German is ‘Pusteblume’ – blow flower, because you can blow to make the seeds fly away.

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